An overview of the descent and landing of the Huygens probe on Titan

@article{Lebreton2005AnOO,
  title={An overview of the descent and landing of the Huygens probe on Titan},
  author={J-P. Lebreton and Olivier G. Witasse and Cl. Sollazzo and Thierry Blancquaert and Patrice Couzin and A. M. Schipper and Jeremy Jones and Dennis Matson and Leonid I. Gurvits and David H. Atkinson and Bobby Kazeminejad and Miguel P{\'e}rez-Ay{\'u}car},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={438},
  pages={758-764}
}
Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only Solar System planetary body other than Earth with a thick nitrogen atmosphere. The Voyager spacecraft confirmed that methane was the second-most abundant atmospheric constituent in Titan's atmosphere, and revealed a rich organic chemistry, but its cameras could not see through the thick organic haze. After a seven-year interplanetary journey on board the Cassini orbiter, the Huygens probe was released on 25 December 2004. It reached the upper layer of… 
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