An orbital period of 0.94 days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b

@article{Hellier2009AnOP,
  title={An orbital period of 0.94 days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b},
  author={Coel Hellier and D. R. Anderson and Andrew Collier Cameron and Micha{\"e}l Gillon and Leslie Hebb and Pierre F. L. Maxted and Didier Queloz and Barry Smalley and A. H. M. J. Triaud and Richard G. West and D. Mark Wilson and Samuel J. Bentley and B. Enoch and Keith Horne and Jonathan M. Irwin and Tim Lister and Michel Mayor and N. R. Parley and Francesco A. Pepe and Don Pollacco and Damien S{\'e}gransan and St{\'e}phane Udry and Peter J. Wheatley},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2009},
  volume={460},
  pages={1098-1100}
}
The ‘hot Jupiters’ that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet–planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only ∼0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal… 
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