An operational system for computer resource sharing

@article{Cosell1975AnOS,
  title={An operational system for computer resource sharing},
  author={Bernie Cosell and Paul R. Johnson and J. H. Malman and Richard E. Schantz and J. Sussman and Robert H. Thomas and David C. Walden},
  journal={Proceedings of the fifth ACM symposium on Operating systems principles},
  year={1975}
}
  • B. Cosell, P. Johnson, +4 authors D. Walden
  • Published 1 November 1975
  • Computer Science
  • Proceedings of the fifth ACM symposium on Operating systems principles
Users and administrators of a small computer often desire more service than it can provide. In a network environment additional services can be provided to the small computer, and in turn to the users of the small computer, by one or more other computers. An operational system for providing such “resource sharing” is described; some “fundamental principles” are abstracted from the experience gained in constructing the system; and some generalizations are suggested. 
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