An operating cost of learning in Drosophila melanogaster

@article{Mery2004AnOC,
  title={An operating cost of learning in Drosophila melanogaster
},
  author={Frederic Mery and Tadeusz J. Kawecki},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2004},
  volume={68},
  pages={589-598}
}

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