An open study to determine the efficacy of blue light in the treatment of mild to moderate acne

@article{Morton2005AnOS,
  title={An open study to determine the efficacy of blue light in the treatment of mild to moderate acne},
  author={Colin A Morton and R D Scholefield and Colin Whitehurst and Jan Birch},
  journal={Journal of Dermatological Treatment},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={219 - 223}
}
Background: The effective management of acne remains a challenge; achieving an optimal response whilst minimizing adverse events is often difficult. The rise in antibiotic resistance threatens to reduce the future usefulness of the current mainstay of therapy. The need for alternative therapies remains important. Phototherapy has previously been shown to be effective in acne, with renewed interest as both endogenous and exogenous photodynamic therapies are demonstrated for this condition… 
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