An official ATS statement: hepatotoxicity of antituberculosis therapy.

@article{Saukkonen2006AnOA,
  title={An official ATS statement: hepatotoxicity of antituberculosis therapy.},
  author={Jussi J. Saukkonen and David L. Cohn and Robert M. Jasmer and Steven Schenker and John A. Jereb and Charles M. Nolan and Charles A Peloquin and Fred M. Gordin and David P Nunes and Doris B. Strader and John Bernardo and Raman Venkataramanan and Timothy R Sterling},
  journal={American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={174 8},
  pages={
          935-52
        }
}
Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a problem of increasing significance, but has been a long-standing concern in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) infection. The liver has a central role in drug metabolism and detoxification, and is consequently vulnerable to injury. The pathogenesis and types of DILI are presented, ranging from hepatic adaptation to hepatocellular injury. Knowledge of the metabolism of anti-TB medications and of the mechanisms of TB DILI is incomplete. Understanding of TB… 
Antituberculosis Drug-Induced Liver Injury: An Ignored Fact, Assessment of Frequency, Patterns, Severity and Risk Factors
TLDR
All patterns of TB DILI with varying severity were present, and age > 35 years, malnutrition, extrapulmonary TB and concomitant use of hepatotoxic drugs were risk factors for TB D ILI.
Antituberculous drug-induced liver injury: current perspective.
  • H. Devarbhavi
  • Medicine
    Tropical gastroenterology : official journal of the Digestive Diseases Foundation
  • 2011
TLDR
Simultaneous rechallenge with combination drugs or sequential treatment have similar incidence of DILI, although increasing reports about the role of pyrazinamide in DILi and on rechallenges warrants its careful use.
Burden of antituberculosis and antiretroviral drug-induced liver injury at a secondary hospital in South Africa.
TLDR
TBT- or ART-associated DILI is a common reason for presentation at a referral hospital in South Africa and in-hospital and 3-month mortality are high.
Antitubercular therapy in patients with cirrhosis: challenges and options.
TLDR
Frequency of hepatotoxicity is increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, frequently leading to severe liver failure, and there are no established guidelines for the treatment of TB in relation to the severity of liver disease.
Evaluation of risk factors for antituberculosis treatment induced hepatotoxicity.
TLDR
Older age, poor nutritional status including baseline hypoalbuminaemia were independent predictors of occurrence of anti-TB DIH and Clinicians should be vigilant for occurrence of hepatotoxicity in this high risk group.
Drug-induced liver injury from antituberculous treatment: a retrospective study from a large TB centre in the UK
TLDR
Only a quarter of patients who developed DILI had British or American Thoracic Society defined criteria for pre-emptive LT monitoring, suggesting that all patients on ATT should be considered for universal liver monitoring particularly during the first 8 weeks of treatment.
Anti-Tuberculosis Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity: A Review
TLDR
This review article deals with the current incidence, mechanism of liver damage induced by different anti-TB drugs and risk factors responsible for anti- TB-DIH, which might provide suitable information for future studies to develop safer treatment for TB.
Correlation of antituberculosis drug-related liver injury and liver function monitoring: A 12-year experience of the Taiwan Drug Relief Foundation.
TLDR
It is concluded that patients with severe ATLI whose records were collected by the TDRF have a high mortality and checking of liver biochemical tests prior to antituberculosis treatment and periodic monitoring of these tests thereafter are highly suggested.
Antituberculosis drug-induced liver injury in chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis.
TLDR
Hepatotoxic anti-TB drugs may be safely used in the patients with chronic liver disease including compensated cirrhosis if number of hepatotoxic drugs used is adjusted appropriately.
A prospective study of antituberculous drug-induced hepatotoxicity in an area endemic for liver diseases
TLDR
Anti-TB-DIH is not uncommon, needs early recognition and treatment, and is more in patients with pre-existing liver disease and low BMI, rather than age, gender, raised baseline transaminases level, and inactive hepatitis B or C carrier state.
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Timely detection and temporary withdrawal of the offending agent can completely cure antitubercular drug—induced hepatotoxicity.
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TLDR
The results showed that ATT-induced hepatitis carried significant morbidity and mortality, that malnutrition was common in patients with ATT-related hepatitis, and that potentially hepatotoxic antituberculosis agents could be safely reintroduced after recovery from hepatitis.
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TLDR
The possibility that hepatocellular damage may be due to the effect of tubercle bacilli products liberated in the liver after their destruction by antituberculous drugs is suggested, however, the high rate of hepatotoxic reactions warns that the dose of 10 mg INH/kg/day should not be exceeded when that drug is combined with RIF.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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