An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity

@article{Bastien2013AnOC,
  title={An observational correlation between stellar brightness variations and surface gravity},
  author={F. Bastien and K. Stassun and G. Basri and J. Pepper},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2013},
  volume={500},
  pages={427-430}
}
Surface gravity is a basic stellar property, but it is difficult to measure accurately, with typical uncertainties of 25 to 50 per cent if measured spectroscopically and 90 to 150 per cent if measured photometrically. Asteroseismology measures gravity with an uncertainty of about 2 per cent but is restricted to relatively small samples of bright stars, most of which are giants. The availability of high-precision measurements of brightness variations for more than 150,000 stars provides an… Expand
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