An inverted continental Moho and serpentinization of the forearc mantle

@article{Bostock2002AnIC,
  title={An inverted continental Moho and serpentinization of the forearc mantle},
  author={Michael G. Bostock and Roy D. Hyndman and St{\'e}phane Rondenay and Simon M. Peacock},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2002},
  volume={417},
  pages={536-538}
}
Volatiles that are transported by subducting lithospheric plates to depths greater than 100 km are thought to induce partial melting in the overlying mantle wedge, resulting in arc magmatism and the addition of significant quantities of material to the overlying lithosphere. Asthenospheric flow and upwelling within the wedge produce increased lithospheric temperatures in this back-arc region, but the forearc mantle (in the corner of the wedge) is thought to be significantly cooler. Here we… 

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