An inverse association between West Nile virus serostatus and avian malaria infection status

@inproceedings{Medeiros2014AnIA,
  title={An inverse association between West Nile virus serostatus and avian malaria infection status},
  author={Matthew C. I. Medeiros and Tavis K. Anderson and Jenni M Higashiguchi and Uriel Dan Kitron and Edward D. Walker and Jeffrey D. Brawn and Bethany Krebs and Marilyn O. Ruiz and Tony L. Goldberg and Robert E. Ricklefs and Gabriel L. Hamer},
  booktitle={Parasites & Vectors},
  year={2014}
}
Various ecological and physiological mechanisms might influence the probability that two or more pathogens may simultaneously or sequentially infect a host individual. Concurrent infections can have important consequences for host condition and fitness, including elevated mortality risks. In addition, interactions between coinfecting pathogens may have important implications for transmission dynamics. Here, we explore patterns of association between two common avian pathogens (West Nile virus… CONTINUE READING
Related Discussions
This paper has been referenced on Twitter 6 times. VIEW TWEETS

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-9 of 9 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 54 references

Avian Malaria Parasites and Other Haemosporidia

G Valkiūnas
Boca Raton: CRC Press; • 2005
View 17 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Avian malaria parasites share congeneric mosquito vectors.

The Journal of parasitology • 2010
View 10 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Ecological rules governing helminth-microparasite coinfection.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America • 2008
View 4 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Parasite diversity and coinfection determine pathogen infection success and host fitness.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America • 2012
View 1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…