An introduction to the Farm‐Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide‐tolerant crops

@article{Firbank2003AnIT,
  title={An introduction to the Farm‐Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide‐tolerant crops},
  author={Les G Firbank and Matthew S. Heard and Ian P. Woiwod and Cathy Hawes and Alison J Haughton and G. T. Champion and Rod J. Scott and Mark O. Hill and Alan M. Dewar and Geoffrey R. Squire and Mike J. May and David R. Brooks and David A. Bohan and Roger E. Daniels and Juliet L. Osborne and David B. Roy and H. I. J. Black and Peter Rothery and J. N. Perry},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2003},
  volume={40},
  pages={2-16}
}
1. Several genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops have cleared most of the regulatory hurdles required for commercial growing in the United Kingdom. However, concerns have been expressed that their management will have negative impacts on farmland biodiversity as a result of improved control given by the new herbicide regimes of the arable plants that support farmland birds and other species of conservation value. 2. The Farm-Scale Evaluations (FSE) project is testing the null… Expand

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