An introduced parasitic fly may lead to local extinction of Darwin's finch populations.

@article{Koop2016AnIP,
  title={An introduced parasitic fly may lead to local extinction of Darwin's finch populations.},
  author={J. A. Koop and P. S. Kim and Sarah A. Knutie and F. Adler and D. Clayton},
  journal={The Journal of applied ecology},
  year={2016},
  volume={53 2},
  pages={
          511-518
        }
}
Introduced pathogens and other parasites are often implicated in host population level declines and extinctions. However, such claims are rarely supported by rigorous real-time data. Indeed, the threat of introduced parasites often goes unnoticed until after host populations have declined severely. The recent introduction of the parasitic nest fly, Philornis downsi, to the Galápagos Islands provides an opportunity to monitor the current impact of an invasive parasite on endemic land bird… Expand
37 Citations
Tri-trophic ecology of native parasitic nest flies of birds in Tobago
Population dynamics of an invasive bird parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae), in the Galapagos Islands
Additive negative effects of Philornis nest parasitism on small and declining Neotropical bird populations
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References

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Galápagos mockingbirds tolerate introduced parasites that affect Darwin's finches.
Invasive Parasites, Habitat Change and Heavy Rainfall Reduce Breeding Success in Darwin's Finches
Darwin’s finches combat introduced nest parasites with fumigated cotton
How to save the rarest Darwin's finch from extinction: the mangrove finch on Isabela Island
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