An intervention to decrease catheter-related bloodstream infections in the ICU.

@article{Pronovost2006AnIT,
  title={An intervention to decrease catheter-related bloodstream infections in the ICU.},
  author={Peter J. Pronovost and Dale M. Needham and Sean M. Berenholtz and David J Sinopoli and Haitao Chu and Sara E. Cosgrove and Bryan J Sexton and Robert C Hyzy and Robert J Welsh and Gary Roth and Joseph J. Bander and John P. Kepros and Christine Goeschel},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={355 26},
  pages={
          2725-32
        }
}
BACKGROUND Catheter-related bloodstream infections occurring in the intensive care unit (ICU) are common, costly, and potentially lethal. METHODS We conducted a collaborative cohort study predominantly in ICUs in Michigan. An evidence-based intervention was used to reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Multilevel Poisson regression modeling was used to compare infection rates before, during, and up to 18 months after implementation of the study intervention. Rates… Expand
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