An index to quantify an individual's scientific research valid across disciplines

@inproceedings{Batista2005AnIT,
  title={An index to quantify an individual's scientific research valid across disciplines},
  author={Pablo Diniz Batista and M{\^o}nica G. Campiteli and Osame Kinouchi and Alexandre Souto Martinez},
  year={2005}
}
The number h of papers with at least h citations has been proposed to evaluate individual's scientific research production. This index is robust in several ways but yet strongly dependent on the research field. We propose a complementary index hI = h^2/N_t, with N_t being the total number of authors in the considered h papers. A researcher with index hI has hI papers with at least hI citation if he/she had published alone. We have obtained the rank plots of h and hI for four Brazilian… 
Comparative analysis of some individual bibliometric indices when applied to groups of researchers
TLDR
A comparative analysis of some bibliometric indicators originally designed to measure the overall impact of individual scientific production, when applied to the evaluation of groups, indicates that the consistency at distinct aggregative levels is met with reasonable frequency.
A “Citation Surplus” Should Be Added to the h-Index
TLDR
The h-index is the largest number h such that h publications have at least h citations and should be supplemented by a researcher’s citation surplus to remedy this deficiency.
The success-index: an alternative approach to the h-index for evaluating an individual’s research output
TLDR
The success-index is introduced, aimed at reducing the NSP-index’s limitations, although requiring more computing effort, and a detailed analysis of it from the point of view of its operational properties and a comparison with the h-index's ones is presented.
Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists
TLDR
The results demonstrate the utility of the βi scaling parameter in conjunction with hi for quantifying individual publication impact and show that the total number of citations Ci tallied from a scientist's Ni papers scales as .
Comparison of the Hirsch-index with standard bibliometric indicators and with peer judgment for 147 chemistry research groups
TLDR
Characteristics of the statistical correlation between the Hirsch (h-) index and several standard bibliometric indicators are presented, as well as with the results of peer review judgment, which show that the h-index and the bibliometry ‘crown indicator’ both relate in a quite comparable way with peer judgments.
Comparison of bibliometric measures for assessing relative importance of researchers
TLDR
Simulated data is used to study factors that could potentially influence the degree of agreement between the rankings obtained when using different indices with the emphasis given to the comparison of the number of net citations per author to other more established indices.
A two-dimensional bibliometric index reflecting both quality and quantity
TLDR
A comprehensive empirical analysis of this two-dimensional bibliometric index is presented, which captures both aspects of a researcher’s output on two datasets: a large set of Google Scholar profiles (representing “typical” researchers) and a small set of Nobel prize winners.
Multiple Citation Indicators and Their Composite across Scientific Disciplines
TLDR
Multiple citation indicators that address total impact, co-authorship adjustment, and author order may give a more comprehensive picture of impact, although no citation indicator, single or composite, can be expected to select all the best scientists.
Central indexes to the citation distribution: a complement to the h-index
TLDR
Two original sets of indexes, the central area indexes and the central interval indexes, that complement the h-index to include the central shape of the citation distribution, are proposed and compared.
...
...