An improved method for determining codon variability in a gene and its application to the rate of fixation of mutations in evolution

@article{Fitch2004AnIM,
  title={An improved method for determining codon variability in a gene and its application to the rate of fixation of mutations in evolution},
  author={W. Fitch and E. Markowitz},
  journal={Biochemical Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={4},
  pages={579-593}
}
If one has the amino acid sequences of a set of homologous proteins as well as their phylogenetic relationships, one can easily determine the minimum number of mutations (nucleotide replacements) which must have been fixed in each codon since their common ancestor. It is found that for 29 species of cytochrome c the data fit the assumption that there is a group of approximately 32 invariant codons and that the remainder compose two Poisson-distributed groups of size 65 and 16 codons, the latter… Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • 2005
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  • W. Fitch
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • 2005
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