Corpus ID: 116764292

An implementation guide to a proposed standard for floating-point arithmetic

@inproceedings{Coonen1980AnIG,
  title={An implementation guide to a proposed standard for floating-point arithmetic},
  author={J. Coonen},
  year={1980}
}
  • J. Coonen
  • Published 1980
  • Computer Science
  • This standard is a product of the Floating-Point Working Group of the Microprocessor Standards Subcommittee of the Standards Committee of the IEEE Computer Society. This work was sponsored by the Technical Committee on Microprocessors and Minicomputers. Draft 8.0 of this standard was published to solicit public comments. [FOOTNOTE 1: Computer Magazine vol 14, no 3, March 1981.] Implementation techniques can be found in An Implementation Guide to a Proposed Standard for Floating-Point Arithmetic… CONTINUE READING
    47 Citations

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    References

    SHOWING 1-7 OF 7 REFERENCES
    <> y is TRUE only when x < y or x > y, and is distinct from x !=
    • <> y is TRUE only when x < y or x > y, and is distinct from x !=
    Copysign(x, y) returns x with the sign of y. Hence, abs(x) = copysign( x, 1.0), even if x is NaN
    • Copysign(x, y) returns x with the sign of y. Hence, abs(x) = copysign( x, 1.0), even if x is NaN
    Finite(x) returns the value TRUE if –INFINITY < x < +INFINITY, and returns FALSE otherwise
    • Finite(x) returns the value TRUE if –INFINITY < x < +INFINITY, and returns FALSE otherwise
    Isnan(x), or equivalently x != x, returns the value TRUE if x is a NaN, and returns FALSE otherwise
    • Isnan(x), or equivalently x != x, returns the value TRUE if x is a NaN, and returns FALSE otherwise
    Scalb(y, N) returns y × 2 N for integral values N without computing 2 N
    • Scalb(y, N) returns y × 2 N for integral values N without computing 2 N
    Unordered(x, y), or x ? y, returns the value TRUE if x is unordered with y, and returns FALSE otherwise
    • Unordered(x, y), or x ? y, returns the value TRUE if x is unordered with y, and returns FALSE otherwise
    –x is x copied with its sign reversed, not 0 – x; the distinction is germane when x is ±0 or NaN. Consequently, it is a mistake to use the sign bit to distinguish signaling NaNs from quiet NaNs
    • –x is x copied with its sign reversed, not 0 – x; the distinction is germane when x is ±0 or NaN. Consequently, it is a mistake to use the sign bit to distinguish signaling NaNs from quiet NaNs