An exploration of individuals' preferences for nutrition care from Australian primary care health professionals.

@article{Ball2014AnEO,
  title={An exploration of individuals' preferences for nutrition care from Australian primary care health professionals.},
  author={Lauren E. Ball and Ben Desbrow and Michael D Leveritt},
  journal={Australian journal of primary health},
  year={2014},
  volume={20 1},
  pages={
          113-20
        }
}
This qualitative study explored individuals' preferences regarding the provision of nutrition care from Australian health professionals and the factors influencing their preferences. [] Key Method Thirty-eight individuals aged 53±8 years, living with a lifestyle-related chronic disease or risk factor for lifestyle-related chronic disease, participated in a semi-structured telephone interview.

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