An explanation of the persistence of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter

@article{Kyrala1982AnEO,
  title={An explanation of the persistence of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter},
  author={A. Kyrala},
  journal={The moon and the planets},
  year={1982},
  volume={26},
  pages={105-107}
}
  • A. Kyrala
  • Published 1982
  • Geology
  • The moon and the planets
An argument is given basing the persistence of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter on compensation of the natural decay of vorticity by collision with a portion of the vortices shed by the South boundary of the South Tropical Zone. The latter are deviated northward by Coriolis acceleration. The GRS itself is regarded as a Rankine vortex with a central depression revealing the coloration of a layer below. 
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THE Great Red Spot in the southern hemisphere of Jupiter's otherwise ever-changing surface of dense cloud has baffled astronomers for many years1,2. The purpose of this communication is to outlineExpand
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Using sequences of Voyager 1 high-resolution images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and White Oval BC we map the flow fields within the GRS and Oval BC. We compute relative vorticity within theseExpand
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Voyager 1 and 2 narrow-angle frames were used to obtain displacements of features at resolutions of 130 km over time intervals of 1 Jovian rotation. The zonal velocity ū was constant to 1.5% duringExpand