An experimental test of the effects of dieting on bulimic symptoms: the impact of eating episode frequency.

Abstract

Prospective studies suggest dieting increases bulimic symptoms, but experiments suggest that dieting decreases bulimic symptoms. One possible explanation for the conflicting findings is that real world dieting involves less healthy dieting techniques, such as meal skipping, than prescribed diets. We tested whether the manipulation of eating episode frequency during dieting impacted bulimic symptoms. We expected that people on a diet involving fewer eating episodes would exhibit greater increases in bulimic symptoms than people on a diet involving more frequent eating episodes or waitlist controls. Participants on both 6-week diets lost more weight than controls, confirming dieting was manipulated, and showed greater reductions in bulimic symptoms than controls; however, the dieting conditions did not differ on either outcome. Results provide further experimental evidence that dieting does not increase bulimic symptoms, but suggests that eating episode frequency has little impact on this outcome.

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Cite this paper

@article{Groesz2007AnET, title={An experimental test of the effects of dieting on bulimic symptoms: the impact of eating episode frequency.}, author={Lisa M Groesz and Eric Stice}, journal={Behaviour research and therapy}, year={2007}, volume={45 1}, pages={49-62} }