An experimental study on the effects of an introduced parasite in Darwin's finches.

@article{Fessl2006AnES,
  title={An experimental study on the effects of an introduced parasite in Darwin's finches.},
  author={Birgit Fessl and Sonia Kleindorfer and Sabine Tebbich},
  journal={Biological Conservation},
  year={2006},
  volume={127},
  pages={55-61}
}
Abstract It is widely recognised that the main threats to the biota of the Galapagos Islands stem from newly introduced diseases, plants and animals. Introduced organisms may lead to the rapid extinction of naive insular populations. Previous research on Galapagos showed that the parasitic larvae of the fly Philornis downsi occurred in virtually all nests of land bird species examined, with high nestling mortality (27% of all broods) in relation to high parasite infestation. In this study, we… Expand
Experimental Demonstration of the Fitness Consequences of an Introduced Parasite of Darwin's Finches
TLDR
The results confirm that P. downsi has significant negative effects on the fitness of medium ground finches, and they may pose a serious threat to other species of Darwin's finches. Expand
Weed management increases the detrimental effect of an invasive parasite on arboreal Darwin's finches
TLDR
A negative additive effect of parasitism and weed management is found on the breeding success of the insectivorous warbler finch, but not on the omnivorous small tree finch (Camarhynchus parvulus), which was strongly affected by parasitism independently of weed management. Expand
Effects of an introduced parasitic nest fly on endemic avian hosts in the Galapagos Islands
TLDR
This work demonstrates that mockingbird reservoir hosts of P. downsi change their behavior to tolerate parasite damage, and presents evidence that self-fumigation by finches can be used as an effective stopgap approach to control P.downsi. Expand
An introduced parasitic fly may lead to local extinction of Darwin's finch populations.
TLDR
The study demonstrates the predicted high risk of local extinction of an abundant host species, the medium ground finch Geospiza fortis due to an introduced parasite, Philornis downsi, and suggests that careful management practices aimed at reducing parasite prevalence have the potential to significantly lower the risk of host species extinction. Expand
Effects of the introduced parasite Philornis downsi on nestling growth and mortality in the medium ground finch (Geospiza fortis)
Invasive species have the potential to detrimentally affect native ecosystems by out competing or directly preying upon native organisms, and have been implicated in the extinction of endemicExpand
Changes in Philornis infestation behavior threaten Darwin's finch survival
TLDR
Testing the hypothesis that P. downsi flies are laying eggs in finch nests earlier in the nestling phase to maximize larval feeding time and therefore chance of pupation success before host death reveals new fitness costs to both the parasite and Darwin's finches. Expand
Invasion of an Avian Nest Parasite, Philornis downsi, to the Galapagos Islands: Colonization History, Adaptations to Novel Ecosystems, and Conservation Challenges
This chapter discusses the invasion of an avian nest fly, Philornis downsi, to the Galapagos Islands, its interactions with novel bird hosts, and the strategies that are being implemented to protectExpand
Parasite infestation and predation in Darwin's small ground finch: contrasting two elevational habitats between islands
TLDR
It is suggested that the impacts of an introduced parasite are limited by its niche requirements and resource availability within and across islands, and that the vulnerability of bird populations to introduced parasites and predators is linked with variation in life history strategies across habitats. Expand
Native parasitic nest fly impacts reproductive success of an island‐endemic host
TLDR
The results indicate that parasitism by nest flies decreases survival and fledging success of nestling Ridgway's hawks and is a possible factor in the decline of the species. Expand
The life-cycle of Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) parasitizing Darwin's finches and its impacts on nestling survival
TLDR
All larval instars for the first time are described, and infection intensity and impacts of parasitism on nestling survival of Darwin's finches are discussed, highlighting the extremely serious threat this parasite poses for the endemic passerine fauna of the Galápagos Islands. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 51 REFERENCES
High blowfly parasitic loads affect breeding success in a Mediterranean population of blue tits
TLDR
It is shown that the attack by Protocalliphora causes anaemia and an important disturbance to the chicks, which suggests that in this population of blue tit, blowflies decrease the probability of recruitment of young blue tits. Expand
Philornis downsi - a recently discovered parasite on the Galápagos archipelago: a threat for Darwin's finches?
TLDR
Parasite load per nest showed little variation, but variation in brood size led to different infestation rates per nestling, thus inducing a possible impact on population dynamics. Expand
Detrimental effects of larval blow flies (Protocalliphora azurea) on nestlings and breeding success of Tree Sparrows (Passer montanus)
TLDR
Large numbers of blow fly larvae and pupae significantly influenced nestling survival and fledging success and a significant negative effect of parasite load per nestling was found in the second broods only in the 10- and 13-day-old chi... Expand
Effects of the parasitic flies of the genus Philornis (Diptera: Muscidae) on birds
TLDR
The impetus for this review is the recent discovery of Philornis downsi on the Galapagos Archipelago, combined with high PhilORNis-induced mortality in Darwin's finches, highlighting the potential for ectoparasites such as PhilornIS to compromise the viability of small, isolated bird populations. Expand
Effects of the introduced ectoparasite Philornis downsi on haemoglobin level and nestling survival in Darwin's Small Ground Finch (Geospiza fuliginosa)
TLDR
It is shown that endemic Galapagos bird populations are physiologically compromised by P. downsi and experience substantial fitness costs due to ectoparasitism, and immature red blood cell counts were negatively correlated with Hb level and positively correlated with P.downsi intensity. Expand
Growth, nutrition, and blow fly parasitism in nestling Pied Flycatchers
TLDR
Nests provided with supplementary food and with low numbers of parasites grew faster and had a higher haematocrit value than those in groups that were fumigated and given supplementary food, with nestlings from control nests attaining the lowest values. Expand
THE EPIZOOTIOLOGY AND ECOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF MALARIA IN HAWAIIAN LAND BIRDS
TLDR
Avian malaria probably did not reach epizootic proportions on Hawaii until after 1920, but since that time it has had a negative impact on the population dynamics of the native forest birds and is today a major limiting factor, restricting both abundance and distribution of these species on the island. Expand
The Rarest of Darwin’s Finches
The Mangrove Finch (Cactospiza heliobates) is unique among Darwin’s finches in its specialized habits and naturally fragmented distribution on individual islands. It has been reported to occupy sixExpand
Increasing prevalence of avian poxvirus in Darwin's finches and its effect on male pairing success
TLDR
Darwin's finch species were found to be differentially affected by poxvirus, with a higher prevalence in ground finches than in tree finches, and there was a significant effect of habitat, even within species, with high prevalence in the lowlands than highlands. Expand
Alien Insects: Threats and Implications for Conservation of Galápagos Islands
TLDR
A newly developed and simple scoring system is presented to predict alien insect species potential invasiveness based on trophic functional role, distribution in Galápagos, and history ofInvasiveness elsewhere. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...