An experimental study of behavioural group size effects in tammar wallabies, Macropus eugenii

@article{Blumstein1999AnES,
  title={An experimental study of behavioural group size effects in tammar wallabies, Macropus eugenii
},
  author={Daniel T. Blumstein and Christoper S. Evans and Janice C. Daniel},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1999},
  volume={58},
  pages={351-360}
}
As animals aggregate with others, the time they allot to social and nonsocial activities changes. Antipredator models of vigilance and foraging group size effects both predict a nonlinear relationship between group size and the time allocated to behaviour. Group size effects were experimentally studied in captive adult female tammar wallabies, a small macropodid marsupial, by increasing group size from 1 to 10. Tammars foraged more, looked less, groomed more, engaged in more aggressive… Expand
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