An expanding radio nebula produced by a giant flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20

@article{Gaensler2005AnER,
  title={An expanding radio nebula produced by a giant flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20},
  author={Bryan M. Gaensler and Chryssa Kouveliotou and Joseph D. Gelfand and Gregory B. Taylor and David Eichler and Ralph Wijers and Jonathan Granot and Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz and Yuri Lyubarsky and Richard W. Hunstead and Duncan Campbell-Wilson and A. van der Horst and Maura Mclaughlin and Robert P. Fender and Michael A. Garrett and Katherine Newton-McGee and David M. Palmer and Neil A. Gehrels and Paul M. Woods},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={1104-1106}
}
Soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) are ‘magnetars’, a small class of slowly spinning neutron stars with extreme surface magnetic fields, B ≈ 1015 gauss (refs 1 , 2 –3). On 27 December 2004, a giant flare was detected from the magnetar SGR 1806 - 20 (ref. 2), only the third such event recorded. This burst of energy was detected by a variety of instruments and even caused an ionospheric disturbance in the Earth's upper atmosphere that was recorded around the globe. Here we report the detection of a… 

A giant γ-ray flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20

Two classes of rotating neutron stars—soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars—are magnetars, whose X-ray emission is powered by a very strong magnetic field (B ≈ 1015 G). SGRs

A Rebrightening of the Radio Nebula Associated with the 2004 December 27 Giant Flare from SGR 1806–20

The 2004 December 27 giant γ-ray flare detected from the magnetar SGR 1806-20 created an expanding radio nebula that we have monitored with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Very Large

Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup

The radio nebula produced by the 27 December 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20

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Soft-γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) are galactic X-ray stars that emit numerous short-duration (about 0.1 s) bursts of hard X-rays during sporadic active periods. They are thought to be magnetars: strongly

A Two-Component Explosion Model for the Giant Flare and Radio Afterglow from SGR 1806–20

The brightest giant flare from the soft γ-ray repeater (SGR) 1806-20 was detected on 2004 December 27. The isotropic-equivalent energy release of this burst is at least 1 order of magnitude more

Numerical modeling of the radio nebula from the 2004 december 27 giant flare of SGR 1806-20

We use the relativistic hydrodynamics code Cosmos++ to model the evolution of the radio nebula triggered by the 2004 December 27 giant flare event of SGR 1806-20. We primarily focus on the

Diagnosing the Outflow from the SGR 1806-20 Giant Flare with Radio Observations

On 2004 December 27, the soft gamma repeater (SGR) 1806-20 emitted the brightest giant flare (GF) ever detected from an SGR. This burst of energy, which resulted in an (isotropic) energy release ~100

Magnetar Giant Flare Origin for GRB 200415A Inferred from a New Scaling Relation

Soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are a mainly Galactic population and originate from neutron stars with intense (B ≃ 1015 G) magnetic fields (magnetars). Occasionally, a giant flare occurs with

The Growth, Polarization, and Motion of the Radio Afterglow from the Giant Flare from SGR 1806–20

The extraordinary giant flare (GF) of 2004 December 27 from the soft gamma repeater SGR 1806-20 was followed by a bright radio afterglow. We present an analysis of VLA observations of this radio
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A giant γ-ray flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20

Two classes of rotating neutron stars—soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars—are magnetars, whose X-ray emission is powered by a very strong magnetic field (B ≈ 1015 G). SGRs

Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup

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