An exceptionally bright flare from SGR 1806–20 and the origins of short-duration γ-ray bursts

@article{Hurley2005AnEB,
  title={An exceptionally bright flare from SGR 1806–20 and the origins of short-duration $\gamma$-ray bursts},
  author={Kevin Hurley and Steven E. Boggs and Da. G. Munro Smith and Robert C. Duncan and Robert P. Lin and Andreas Zoglauer and S{\"a}m Krucker and G. J. Hurford and Hugh S. Hudson and Claudia Wigger and Wojtek Hajdas and C. Thompson and Igor G. Mitrofanov and Anton B. Sanin and William V. Boynton and Chuck Fellows and A. von Kienlin and Giselher G. Lichti and Arne Rau and Thomas L. Cline},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={1098-1103}
}
Soft-γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) are galactic X-ray stars that emit numerous short-duration (about 0.1 s) bursts of hard X-rays during sporadic active periods. They are thought to be magnetars: strongly magnetized neutron stars with emissions powered by the dissipation of magnetic energy. Here we report the detection of a long (380 s) giant flare from SGR 1806–20, which was much more luminous than any previous transient event observed in our Galaxy. (In the first 0.2 s, the flare released as much… Expand

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