An evolving landscape: reproductive genetics, new technologies and health care over the next decade.

Abstract

The rapid advancement of reproductive science, fueled by such major events as the completion of the human genome project in April 2003 [1] and marked by technologies such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), has brought a sea of change in health care that has already begun to impact our lives. And, for all of the benefits and risks involved, reproductive genetics will continue to influence health care in significant ways over the next decade. The swift growth in these new technologies calls for reproductive health providers to thoroughly educate themselves, to better understand implications for health care practice, to advocate for clear safety measures to ensure the health and well-being of those who use these technologies and to advance policies that promote health equity. Advancements in genetics generally, and in reproductive genetics specifically, bring with them a host of ethical, legal and social concerns that the reproductive health care community will face for years to come. As a result, we are facing three major changes:

DOI: 10.1016/j.contraception.2007.05.093

Cite this paper

@article{Aarons2008AnEL, title={An evolving landscape: reproductive genetics, new technologies and health care over the next decade.}, author={Jessica Aarons and Jennifer Aulwes and Wayne C Shields and Emily Galpern and Lee P Shulman}, journal={Contraception}, year={2008}, volume={78 6}, pages={433-5} }