An evaluation of vertebrate seed dispersal syndromes in four species of black nightshade (Solanum sect. Solanum)

@article{Tamboia2004AnEO,
  title={An evaluation of vertebrate seed dispersal syndromes in four species of black nightshade (Solanum sect. Solanum)},
  author={Teri Tamboia and Martin Cipollini and Douglas J. Levey},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={107},
  pages={522-532}
}
We examined the ecological relevance of bird versus mammal dispersal syndromes in four species of Solanum, S. americanum Type A, S. americanum Type B, S. ptychanthum, and S. sarrachoides. These plants were selected because their morphological characteristics, such as fruit color, mass, and persistence, resembled those typically associated with classically-defined bird and mammal dispersal syndromes. We monitored persistence of tagged fruits, compared physical and chemical chaacteristics… 
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