[An epidemiological study on low back pain and occupational risk factors among clinical nurses].

Abstract

Recently medical services and nursing system are being reformed due to high medical costs and shortage of clinical nurses. The shortage of clinical nurses influences not only their working conditions but also their own health problems. In European countries and the United States, low back pain (LBP) has been reported to be one of the most common and costly health problems among clinical nurses. To estimate the occupational risk factors of LBP among nurses, a questionnaire survey of LBP and occupational risk factors was carried out in 1987 on 947 clinical nurses and as well as on 300 female clerical workers of three local governments. First, to examine the prevalence and the magnitude of the problem, we analyzed several kinds of prevalence rates of LBP and its characteristics among nurses and clerical workers. Second, a case-control study was conducted to investigate the relationship between LBP and occupational risk factors. In analyzing occupational risk factors of LBP, odds ratios, age adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed. Finally, to estimate simultaneously the effect of multiple risk factors of LBP and to confirm univariate age adjusted odds ratio analyses, several multivariate analyses were performed. Point, period (a month), and lifetime prevalence rates of LBP and prevalence rate of severe LBP among clinical nurses were significantly higher than those of clerical workers (p less than 0.05-0.001, respectively). Demographic and occupational items, such as being an assistant nurse (as opposed to a registered nurse), and working in certain departments (internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, psychiatry, tuberculosis ward) showed significantly higher odds ratios for LBP (p less than 0.05-0.001, for all). Many items pertaining to working conditions connected with shift work, hospitalized conditions of patients, taking breaks and holidays, working postures, weight of patients and equipment lifting and moving, working environments and so on had significantly elevated age adjusted odds ratios (p less than 0.05-0.001, for all). Intensity of work loads estimated subjectively such as 'caring for patients who are in bed', 'supporting patients when transporting and bathing them', 'preparing drugs and injections, and treating', 'observing and monitoring patients' conditions', 'instructing and explaining procedure to patients and their family' and so on also had significantly elevated age adjusted odds ratios (p less than 0.05-0.001, for all). Moreover, many items on the problems connected with working life and interpersonal relationships showed significantly higher age adjusted odds ratios (p less than 0.05-0.001). In multivariate analyses, independent variables which made a significant contribution to the model were similar to the items which had significantly elevated age adjusted odds ratios.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Cite this paper

@article{Koda1991AnES, title={[An epidemiological study on low back pain and occupational risk factors among clinical nurses].}, author={Shigeki Koda and A Hisashige and Takahiro Ogawa and Norio Kurumatani and M. Dejima and Takashi Miyakita and Ryo Kodera and Hirofumi Hamada and Shin-ichi Nakagiri and Hidefumi Aoyama}, journal={Sangyō igaku. Japanese journal of industrial health}, year={1991}, volume={33 5}, pages={410-22} }