An enigmatic hypoplastic defect of the deciduous canine.

@article{Skinner1986AnEH,
  title={An enigmatic hypoplastic defect of the deciduous canine.},
  author={Mark F. Skinner},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={1986},
  volume={69 1},
  pages={
          59-69
        }
}
  • M. Skinner
  • Published 1986
  • Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
A roughly circular hypoplastic defect restricted to the labial enamel surface of the deciduous canine is described. This pathology is quite common in available samples of Upper Paleolithic and Neolithic children and a cadaver sample of recent Calcuttans, affecting 44% to 70% of individuals. It is rare in a Neanderthal sample and in children from a clinical practice in Vancouver. The lesion occurs twice as commonly in the lower jaw. The defect appears to commence at or after birth owing to… 
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