An engineered PET depolymerase to break down and recycle plastic bottles

@article{Tournier2020AnEP,
  title={An engineered PET depolymerase to break down and recycle plastic bottles},
  author={V. Tournier and Christopher M. Topham and A. Gilles and Bolzonella David and C Folgoas and Elisabeth Moya-Leclair and E. Kamionka and Marie-Laure Desrousseaux and Henri Texier and Sandra Gavald{\'a} and M. Cot and E. Gu{\'e}mard and M. Dalibey and Julian Nomme and Gianluca Cioci and Sophie Barbe and Michel Chateau and Isabelle Andr{\'e} and Sophie Duquesne and Alain Marty},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020},
  volume={580},
  pages={216-219}
}
Present estimates suggest that of the 359 million tons of plastics produced annually worldwide 1 , 150–200 million tons accumulate in landfill or in the natural environment 2 . Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is the most abundant polyester plastic, with almost 70 million tons manufactured annually worldwide for use in textiles and packaging 3 . The main recycling process for PET, via thermomechanical means, results in a loss of mechanical properties 4 . Consequently, de novo synthesis is… Expand
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