An endoscopic test for bit-induced nasopharyngeal asphyxia as a cause of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage in the horse.

@article{Cook2014AnET,
  title={An endoscopic test for bit-induced nasopharyngeal asphyxia as a cause of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage in the horse.},
  author={William R. Cook},
  journal={Equine veterinary journal},
  year={2014},
  volume={46 2},
  pages={256-7}
}
In their article on sudden death in racehorses, Lyle et al. [1] expressed the hope that their study would stimulate hypothesis-led investigations into possible causes. Currently, there is no consensus on the first cause of exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH). But the 2 leading mechanistic hypotheses are only at odds over the flimsiest of barriers – the pulmonary air/blood barrier. The majority opinion is that ‘bleeding’ occurs because of abnormally high capillary pressure on the blood… CONTINUE READING

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Upper airway obstruction (partial asphyxia) as the possible cause of exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage in the horse: an hypothesis

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Highly Influential
8 Excerpts

A method for measuring bit-induced pain and distress in the ridden horse

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  • Proceedings of the International Society of…
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Metal in the Mouth: The Abusive Effects of Bitted Bridles, Sabine Kells, Qualicum

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Pathophysiology of bit control in the horse

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