An axeman in the cherry orchard: Early intervention rhetoric distorts public policy

@article{Amos2013AnAI,
  title={An axeman in the cherry orchard: Early intervention rhetoric distorts public policy},
  author={Andrew James Amos},
  journal={Australian \& New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2013},
  volume={47},
  pages={317 - 320}
}
  • A. Amos
  • Published 1 April 2013
  • Medicine
  • Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47(4) In psychiatric as well as other reform processes, logic and scientific evidence are necessary but insufficient. Rhetoric, marketing, effective networking, altruistic promotion of a vital public health issue, economic arguments and a confluence of common interests have fuelled the momentum and are vital for real reform to take root. McGorry et al. (2005: s2) 
Evidence-based mental health services reform in Australia: Where to next?
TLDR
In the ANZJP, there has been on-going discussion and debate about three reforms in particular: the Better Access scheme, the Healthy Kids Check and the roll-out of early psychosis services.

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