An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years

@article{Westerhold2020AnAD,
  title={An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years},
  author={T. Westerhold and N. Marwan and A. Drury and D. Liebrand and C. Agnini and Eleni Anagnostou and James S. K. Barnet and S. Bohaty and D. De Vleeschouwer and F. Florindo and Thomas Frederichs and D. A. Hodell and A. Holbourn and D. Kroon and V. Lauretano and K. Littler and L. Lourens and M. Lyle and H. P{\"a}like and U. R{\"o}hl and J. Tian and R. Wilkens and P. Wilson and J. Zachos},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={369},
  pages={1383 - 1387}
}
  • T. Westerhold, N. Marwan, +21 authors J. Zachos
  • Published 2020
  • Geology, Medicine
  • Science
  • The response of Earth’s climate system to orbital forcing has been highly state dependent over the past 66 million years. The states of past climate Deep-sea benthic foraminifera preserve an essential record of Earth's past climate in their oxygen- and carbon-isotope compositions. However, this record lacks sufficient temporal resolution and/or age control in some places to determine which climate forcing and feedback mechanisms were most important. Westerhold et al. present a highly resolved… CONTINUE READING
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