An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years

@article{Westerhold2020AnAD,
  title={An astronomically dated record of Earth’s climate and its predictability over the last 66 million years},
  author={Thomas Westerhold and Norbert Marwan and Anna Joy Drury and Diederik Liebrand and Claudia Agnini and Eleni Anagnostou and James S.K. Barnet and Steven M. Bohaty and David De Vleeschouwer and Fabio Florindo and Thomas Frederichs and David A. Hodell and Ann E. Holbourn and Dick Kroon and Vittoria Lauretano and Kate Littler and Lucas J. Lourens and Mitchell Lyle and Heiko P{\"a}like and Ursula (Ulla) R{\"o}hl and Jun Tian and Roy H. Wilkens and Paul A Wilson and James C. Zachos},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={369},
  pages={1383 - 1387}
}
The response of Earth’s climate system to orbital forcing has been highly state dependent over the past 66 million years. The states of past climate Deep-sea benthic foraminifera preserve an essential record of Earth's past climate in their oxygen- and carbon-isotope compositions. However, this record lacks sufficient temporal resolution and/or age control in some places to determine which climate forcing and feedback mechanisms were most important. Westerhold et al. present a highly resolved… Expand
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