An account of the dissection of a Porpess, promised numb. 74; made, and communicated in a letter of Sept. 12 1671, by the learned Mr. John Ray, having there in obser'd some things omitted by Rondeletius

@article{RayAnAO,
  title={An account of the dissection of a Porpess, promised numb. 74; made, and communicated in a letter of Sept. 12 1671, by the learned Mr. John Ray, having there in obser'd some things omitted by Rondeletius},
  author={John Ray},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London},
  volume={6},
  pages={2274 - 2279}
}
  • John Ray
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
Sir, About the later end of April 1669, being at Westchester with my Lord Bishop of that Diocess, in the company of Fr. Willugbby Esq; I had the good fortune to meet with a young Porpess a convenient size for Dissection, brought thither by some Fishermen.who caught him upon the Sands, where the Tide had left him; in the Anatomy whereof I observed some things omitted by Rondeletius in his Description of the Dolphin. 
Edward Tyson’s 1680 Account of the ‘Porpess’ Brain and its Place in the History of Comparative Neurology
  • L. Kruger
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  • Journal of the history of the neurosciences
  • 2003
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This rare monograph accounts for the contention that Tyson was the founder of comparative anatomy in England, by using this ‘fish’ to better understand the human condition. Expand
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What kind of exchanges took place between fishermen and fishmongers on the one hand and Fellows on the other, and where, how and why these were incorporated into the fish book are examined. Expand
Thar she blows … and dives, and feeds, and talks, and hears, and thinks: The anatomical adaptations of aquatic mammals
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It is important to know how to distinguish a shark from a dolphin when you are in the water, and you can also tell the size of the shark or dolphin, says Dr Reidenberg. Expand
The History of Whales-Their Adaptation to Life in the Water
  • R. Kellogg
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1928
TLDR
It is possible that the forebears of the whales may have found either a safe refuge from more active predatory types, or an abundance of food in shallow water and along the shores, and available data indicate that the late Sir William Flower was not far wrong when he suggested that the ancestors of whales frequented fresh water and that search for their remains should be made in the fresh water deposits of the Cretaceous period. Expand
Fresh fish : Observation up close in late seventeenth-century England
The traditional view of London's Royal Society as a closed circle has been subject to revision in the past decades. Historians have shown the considerable extent to which the Fellows of the Society...
When Whales Became Mammals: The Scientific Journey of Cetaceans From Fish to Mammals in the History of Science
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This is an open access chapter distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Expand