An abstract drawing from the 73,000-year-old levels at Blombos Cave, South Africa

@article{Henshilwood2018AnAD,
  title={An abstract drawing from the 73,000-year-old levels at Blombos Cave, South Africa},
  author={Christopher S. Henshilwood and Francesco d’Errico and Karen L. van Niekerk and Laure Dayet and Alain Queffelec and Luca Pollarolo},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2018},
  volume={562},
  pages={115-118}
}
Abstract and depictive representations produced by drawing—known from Europe, Africa and Southeast Asia after 40,000 years ago—are a prime indicator of modern cognition and behaviour1. Here we report a cross-hatched pattern drawn with an ochre crayon on a ground silcrete flake recovered from approximately 73,000-year-old Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave, South Africa. Our microscopic and chemical analyses of the pattern confirm that red ochre pigment was intentionally applied to the… Expand
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