An Unpublished Arrow-Head with Phoenician Inscription of the 11th-10th Century B. C.

@article{Milik1956AnUA,
  title={An Unpublished Arrow-Head with Phoenician Inscription of the 11th-10th Century B. C.},
  author={J. T. Milik},
  journal={Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research},
  year={1956},
  volume={143},
  pages={3 - 6}
}
  • J. Milik
  • Published 1 October 1956
  • History
  • Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
and 6 mm. thick, at the base of the head, and a square tang, enlarging towards the bulge at the base of the blade, with a maximum thickness of 3 mm. This type of arrow-head is known from Palestine," and the features of our specimen allow us to date it to Early Iron I.3 The central rib bears on both sides an inscription, relatively deep and firmly incised, which runs hszkrb / bnbn'n, i. e. hs Zkr {b} 4 / bn Bn'n, hiss Zakkur bin Bin'ana, " the arrow of Zakkur son of Bin'ana." 
3 Citations

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  • History
    Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research
  • 1980
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