An Olmec “Were-Jaguar” from the Yucatan Peninsula

@article{Metcalf1967AnO,
  title={An Olmec “Were-Jaguar” from the Yucatan Peninsula},
  author={George E. Metcalf and Kent V. Flannery},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={1967},
  volume={32},
  pages={109 - 111}
}
Abstract A feline sculpture in serpentinite from Dsibalchen on the Yucatan Peninsula (probably in the northeast part of the state of Campeche) was found by Teobert Maler in 1887. Its half-human face shares characteristics of the Olmec "were-jaguar" sculptures of Veracruz and Tabasco. 
An Olmec Mask from the Maya Lowlands
Abstract An Olmec mask from northern Petén is a very rare witness to Olmec contact with the Maya lowlands (Central area).
XTOBO, YUCATAN, MEXICO, AND THE EMERGENT PRECLASSIC OF THE NORTHERN MAYA LOWLANDS
Abstract Traditionally, research on the Preclassic Maya has focused on settlements found in the Southern Maya Lowlands. Apart from work at a few well-known archaeological sites in the Northern
2 Olmec Things and Identity: A Reassessment of Offerings and Burials at La Venta, Tabasco
Our study of offerings and elite burials at the Olmec site of La Venta attempts to distinguish primitive valuables from inalienable goods. According to Annette Weiner, inalienable objects are those
So-Called Jaguar-Human Copulation Scenes in Olmec Art
Three Olmec sculptures are frequently thought to represent copulation between human beings and jaguars, an important element in what we are able to reconstruct of Olmec belief, but evidence and
Missionaries' Beasts in New Spain: The Utilization of the European Bestiary Tradition in Sahagún's Florentine Codex
TLDR
This thesis is based on a monograph published in “On the Road to UO: Foundations of a UO Archaeology, 2nd Ed.” (Oxford University Press, 2013).

References

SHOWING 1-3 OF 3 REFERENCES
Tikal, Guatemala, and Emergent Maya Civilization
TLDR
It would be extravagant to claim that these pages have outlined meaningfully the early evolution of Tikal, but considerably more information is needed before a solid evaluation of Preclassic Tikal society can be achieved.
The Maya Civilization. The Southwest Museum, Los Angeles