An Oceanic Origin for Äiwoo, the Language of the Reef Islands?

@article{Ross2007AnOO,
  title={An Oceanic Origin for {\"A}iwoo, the Language of the Reef Islands?},
  author={Malcolm Ross and Malcolm {\AA}shild N{\ae}ss},
  journal={Oceanic Linguistics},
  year={2007},
  volume={46},
  pages={456 - 498}
}
Whether the languages of the Reefs--Santa Cruz (RSC) group have a Papuan or an austronesian origin has long been in dispute. Various background issues are treated in the introductory section. In section 2 we examine the lexicon of the RSC and Utupua-Vanikoro languages and show that there are regular sound correspondences among these languages, and that RSC languages display regular reflexes of Proto-Oceanic etyma and are therefore Austronesian. We also show that together the RSC and Utupua… Expand

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