An MRI study of white matter tract integrity in regular cannabis users: effects of cannabis use and age

@article{Jakabek2016AnMS,
  title={An MRI study of white matter tract integrity in regular cannabis users: effects of cannabis use and age},
  author={David Jakabek and Murat Y{\"u}cel and Valentina Lorenzetti and Nadia Solowij},
  journal={Psychopharmacology},
  year={2016},
  volume={233},
  pages={3627-3637}
}
RationaleConflicting evidence exists on the effects of cannabis use on brain white matter integrity. The extant literature has exclusively focused on younger cannabis users, with no studies sampling older cannabis users.ObjectivesWe recruited a sample with a broad age range to examine the integrity of major white matter tracts in association with cannabis use parameters and neurodevelopmental stage.MethodsRegular cannabis users (n = 56) and non-users (n = 20) with a mean age of 32 (range 18–55… 
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