An Integrated Risk Function for Estimating the Global Burden of Disease Attributable to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure

@article{Burnett2014AnIR,
  title={An Integrated Risk Function for Estimating the Global Burden of Disease Attributable to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure},
  author={R. Burnett and C. Pope and M. Ezzati and Casey Olives and Stephen S. Lim and S. Mehta and H. Shin and Gitanjali M Singh and B. Hubbell and M. Brauer and H. R. Anderson and Kirk R. Smith and J. Balmes and N. Bruce and H. Kan and F. Laden and A. Pr{\"u}ss-Ust{\"u}n and M. Turner and S. Gapstur and W. R. Diver and A. Cohen},
  journal={Environmental Health Perspectives},
  year={2014},
  volume={122},
  pages={397 - 403}
}
Background: Estimating the burden of disease attributable to long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in ambient air requires knowledge of both the shape and magnitude of the relative risk (RR) function. However, adequate direct evidence to identify the shape of the mortality RR functions at the high ambient concentrations observed in many places in the world is lacking. Objective: We developed RR functions over the entire global exposure range for causes of mortality in adults… Expand
The global and national burden of chronic kidney disease attributable to ambient fine particulate matter air pollution: a modelling study
TLDR
The global burden of CKD attributable to PM2.5 is substantial, varies by geography and is disproportionally borne by disadvantaged countries, suggesting that achieving those targets may yield reduction in CKD burden. Expand
Relative Risk Functions for Estimating Excess Mortality Attributable to Outdoor PM2.5 Air Pollution: Evolution and State-of-the-Art
The recent proliferation of cohort studies of long-term exposure to outdoor fine particulate air pollution and mortality has led to a significant increase in knowledge about this important globalExpand
Estimates and 25-year trends of the global burden of disease attributable to ambient air pollution: an analysis of data from the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2015
TLDR
Ambient air pollution contributed substantially to the global burden of disease in 2015, which increased over the past 25 years, due to population ageing, changes in non-communicable disease rates, and increasing air pollution in low-income and middle-income countries. Expand
Burden of disease attributable to ambient fine particulate matter exposure in Taiwan.
TLDR
Ambient PM2.5 pollution is a major mortality risk factor in Taiwan and aggressive and multisectorial intervention strategies are urgently needed to bring down the impact of air pollution on environment and health. Expand
Estimates of the 2016 global burden of kidney disease attributable to ambient fine particulate matter air pollution
TLDR
The results demonstrate that the global toll of CKD attributable to ambient air pollution is significant and identify several endemic geographies where air pollution may be a significant driver of CKd burden. Expand
The attributable risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease due to ambient fine particulate pollution among older adults.
TLDR
Assessment of the cross-sectional association between ambient PM2.5 and prevalence of COPD among adults ≥50 years of age indicates that ambient PM 2.5 exposure could increase the risk of COPC and accounts for a substantial fraction of COPd among the study population. Expand
Loss of life expectancy from air pollution compared to other risk factors: a worldwide perspective
TLDR
Ambient air pollution is one of the main global health risks, causing significant excess mortality and LLE, especially through cardiovascular diseases, and causes an LLE that rivals that of tobacco smoking. Expand
Approximations for Estimating Change in Life Expectancy Attributable to Air Pollution in Relation to Multiple Causes of Death Using a Cause Modified Life Table.
TLDR
Valid approximations comprising expression of change in life expectancy as a function of excess mortality and summation across multiple causes of death are demonstrated. Expand
The contribution of outdoor air pollution sources to premature mortality on a global scale
TLDR
It is found that emissions from residential energy use such as heating and cooking, prevalent in India and China, have the largest impact on premature mortality globally, being even more dominant if carbonaceous particles are assumed to be most toxic. Expand
Cause-specific premature death from ambient PM2.5 exposure in India: Estimate adjusted for baseline mortality.
TLDR
A non-linear power law (NLP) function is developed to estimate the relative risk associated with ambient PM2.5 exposure and resulting annual premature death in India and calls for initiation of long-term measures through a systematic framework of pollution and health data archive. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 155 REFERENCES
Exposure assessment for estimation of the global burden of disease attributable to outdoor air pollution.
TLDR
These estimates expand the evaluation of the global health burden associated with outdoor air pollution, highlighted by increased concentrations in East, South, and Southeast Asia and decreases in North America and Europe. Expand
Lung Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Associated with Ambient Air Pollution and Cigarette Smoke: Shape of the Exposure–Response Relationships
TLDR
At low exposure levels, cardiovascular deaths are projected to account for most of the burden of disease, whereas at high levels of PM2.5, lung cancer becomes proportionately more important. Expand
Ambient particulate air pollution and acute lower respiratory infections: a systematic review and implications for estimating the global burden of disease
TLDR
This analysis strengthens the evidence for a causal relationship between exposure to PM2.5 and the occurrence of ALRI and provides a basis for estimating the global attributable burden of mortality due to ALRI that is not influenced by the wide variation in regional case fatality rates. Expand
How is cardiovascular disease mortality risk affected by duration and intensity of fine particulate matter exposure? An integration of the epidemiologic evidence
TLDR
An integrated evaluation of representative epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a progressive approximately log reduction in the marginal increase in mortality risk for both dimensions of cumulative exposure. Expand
Chronic Fine and Coarse Particulate Exposure, Mortality, and Coronary Heart Disease in the Nurses’ Health Study
TLDR
The findings contribute to growing evidence that chronic PM2.5 exposure is associated with risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and fatal and nonfatal incident coronary heart disease. Expand
Lung cancer, cardiopulmonary mortality, and long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution.
TLDR
Fine particulate and sulfur oxide--related pollution were associated with all-cause, lung cancer, and cardiopulmonary mortality and long-term exposure to combustion-related fine particulate air pollution is an important environmental risk factor for cardiopULmonary and lung cancer mortality. Expand
Particulate Matter Exposures, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study
TLDR
Among this cohort of men with high socioeconomic status living in the midwestern and northeastern United States, the results did not support an association of chronic PM exposures with all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in models with time-varying covariates. Expand
Long-term exposure to air pollution and incidence of cardiovascular events in women.
TLDR
Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution is associated with the incidence of cardiovascular disease and death among postmenopausal women and the between-city effect appeared to be smaller than the within- city effect. Expand
The Association between Fatal Coronary Heart Disease and Ambient Particulate Air Pollution: Are Females at Greater Risk?
TLDR
A positive association with fatal CHD was found with all three PM fractions in females but not in males, and the risk estimates were strengthened when adjusting for gaseous pollutants, especially O3, and were highest for PM2.5. Expand
Long-term exposure to air pollution and cardiorespiratory disease in the California teachers study cohort.
TLDR
This study provides evidence linking long-term exposure to PM2.5 and PM10 with increased risks of incident stroke as well as IHD mortality; exposure to nitrogen oxides was also related to death from cardiovascular diseases. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...