An Example of ‘Mimicry’ in Fishes

@article{Trewavas1947AnEO,
  title={An Example of ‘Mimicry’ in Fishes},
  author={Ethelwynn Trewavas},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1947},
  volume={160},
  pages={120-120}
}
AMONG the genera of Cichlid fishes peculiar to Lake Nyasa, Corematodus, comprising two species, is characterized by the dentition, which consists in each jaw of a broad file-like band of small pointed teeth. Otherwise these two species would be included in the large genus Haplochromis, of which more than a hundred, nearly all endemic, have been recorded from Nyasa. Among the Haplochromis and their related genera in Nyasa, many species have a colour pattern characteristic of the Lake and rarely… 
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