An Evolutionary and Applied Perspective of Insect Biotypes

@article{Diehl1984AnEA,
  title={An Evolutionary and Applied Perspective of Insect Biotypes},
  author={S. Diehl and G. Bush},
  journal={Annual Review of Entomology},
  year={1984},
  volume={29},
  pages={471-504}
}
Benjamin Walsh (174) was probably the first to seriously consider the status of insects that morphologically resemble one another so closely that they can only be distinguished on the basis of subtle biological traits such as preference for or the ability to survive on different hosts. Most of Walsh's "phytophagic varieties" now fall under the rubric "biotype," a term employed primarily by applied biologists to distinguish populations of insects and other organisms whose differences are due to… Expand
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