An Evidence-Based Approach for Choosing Post-exercise Recovery Techniques to Reduce Markers of Muscle Damage, Soreness, Fatigue, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis

@article{Dupuy2018AnEA,
  title={An Evidence-Based Approach for Choosing Post-exercise Recovery Techniques to Reduce Markers of Muscle Damage, Soreness, Fatigue, and Inflammation: A Systematic Review With Meta-Analysis},
  author={Olivier Dupuy and Wafa Douzi and Dimitri Theurot and Laurent Bosquet and Benoit Dugu{\'e}},
  journal={Frontiers in Physiology},
  year={2018},
  volume={9}
}
Introduction: The aim of the present work was to perform a meta-analysis evaluating the impact of recovery techniques on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), perceived fatigue, muscle damage, and inflammatory markers after physical exercise. [] Key Method Overall, 99 studies were included.

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