An Estimate of the Age Distribution of Terrestrial Planets in the Universe: Quantifying Metallicity as a Selection Effect

@article{Lineweaver2001AnEO,
  title={An Estimate of the Age Distribution of Terrestrial Planets in the Universe: Quantifying Metallicity as a Selection Effect},
  author={C. Lineweaver},
  journal={Icarus},
  year={2001},
  volume={151},
  pages={307-313}
}
  • C. Lineweaver
  • Published 2001
  • Physics
  • Icarus
  • Abstract Planets such as the Earth cannot form unless elements heavier than helium are available. These heavy elements, or “metals”, were not produced in the Big Bang. They result from fusion inside stars and have been gradually building up over the lifetime of the Universe. Recent observations indicate that the presence of giant extrasolar planets at small distances from their host stars is strongly correlated with high metallicity of the host stars. The presence of these close-orbiting giants… CONTINUE READING
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