An Epidemiological Perspective of Sudden Death 26-Year Follow-Up in the Framingham Study

@article{Kannel1984AnEP,
  title={An Epidemiological Perspective of Sudden Death 26-Year Follow-Up in the Framingham Study},
  author={Professor William B. Kannel and Daniel L. McGee and Arthur S Schatzkin},
  journal={Drugs},
  year={1984},
  volume={28},
  pages={1-16}
}
Over 26 years of follow-up of 5209 Framingham subjects there were 147 sudden deaths in men and 50 in women. Half the sudden deaths in men and 70% in women occurred without prior coronary heart disease. The incidence doubled with each decade of age, with women lagging men by 20 years. At any age in either sex the risk varied widely in relation to their risk factor make-up. By incorporating systolic pressure, serum cholesterol, vital capacity, cigarette smoking, relative weight, heart rate and… CONTINUE READING
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