An Endophyte Constructs Fungicide-Containing Extracellular Barriers for Its Host Plant

@article{Soliman2015AnEC,
  title={An Endophyte Constructs Fungicide-Containing Extracellular Barriers for Its Host Plant},
  author={Sameh Soliman and John S. Greenwood and Aureliano Bombarely and Lukas A. Mueller and Rong Tsao and Dick D. Mosser and Manish N. Raizada},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={25},
  pages={2570-2576}
}
Surface cracks create sites for pathogen invasion. Yew trees (Taxus) hyperbranch from long-lived buds that lie underneath the bark [1], resulting in persistent bark cracking and deep air pockets, potentially allowing pathogens to enter the nutrient-rich vascular system (vertical phloem and inter-connected radial medullary rays [MR]). Yew is famous as the source of the anti-cancer diterpenoid drug Taxol. A mystery has been why both the tree and its resident non-pathogenic fungi (endophytes… CONTINUE READING
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