An Empirical Example of the Condorcet Paradox of Voting in a Large Electorate

@article{KurrildKlitgaard2001AnEE,
  title={An Empirical Example of the Condorcet Paradox of Voting in a Large Electorate},
  author={Peter Kurrild-Klitgaard},
  journal={Public Choice},
  year={2001},
  volume={107},
  pages={135-145}
}
Social choice theory suggests that the occurrence of cyclical collective preferences should be a widespread phenomenon, especially in large groups of decision-makers. However, empirical research has so far failed to produce evidence of the existence of many real-world examples of such, and none in large electorates. This paper demonstrates the existence of a real cyclical majority in a poll of Danish voters' preferred prime minister, using pair-wise comparisons. This result is compared with… 
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