An Empirical Evaluation of Explanations for State Repression

@article{Hill2014AnEE,
  title={An Empirical Evaluation of Explanations for State Repression},
  author={Daniel W. Hill and Zachary Mark Jones},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={2014},
  volume={108},
  pages={661 - 687}
}
The empirical literature that examines cross-national patterns of state repression seeks to discover a set of political, economic, and social conditions that are consistently associated with government violations of human rights. Null hypothesis significance testing is the most common way of examining the relationship between repression and concepts of interest, but we argue that it is inadequate for this goal, and has produced potentially misleading results. To remedy this deficiency in the… 

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