An Economic Evaluation of the War on Cancer

@article{Sun2010AnEE,
  title={An Economic Evaluation of the War on Cancer},
  author={Eric C. Sun and Anupam B. Jena and Darius N. Lakdawalla and Carolina M. Reyes and Tomas J. Philipson and Dana P Goldman},
  journal={Political Economy: Government Expenditures \& Related Policies eJournal},
  year={2010}
}
  • E. Sun, A. Jena, +3 authors D. Goldman
  • Published 1 December 2009
  • Business, Medicine, Economics
  • Political Economy: Government Expenditures & Related Policies eJournal
For decades, the US public and private sectors have committed substantial resources towards cancer research, but the societal payoff has not been well-understood. We quantify the value of recent gains in cancer survival, and analyze the distribution of value among various stakeholders. Between 1988 and 2000, life expectancy for cancer patients increased by roughly four years, and the average willingness-to-pay for these survival gains was roughly $322,000. Improvements in cancer survival during… 

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It has been estimated that as much as $300 billion may have been spent on cancer research since the war on cancer was announced by President Nixon in 1971 [1]. As well as bringing about huge
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