An Early Jurassic jumping frog

@article{Shubin1995AnEJ,
  title={An Early Jurassic jumping frog},
  author={Neil H. Shubin and Farish A. Jenkins},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1995},
  volume={377},
  pages={49-52}
}
WITH nearly 4,000 living species1, frogs are numerically the most successful of modern amphibian groups. Their distinctive anatomy, which exhibits numerous unique features in both the axial and appendicular skeletons2á¤-6, represents a major departure from the body plan of Palaeozoic amphibians. We report here the discovery of the earliest known frog, associated with caecilians that retained limbs7, that exhibits primitive characters but shares with later anurans such features as fusion of the… 
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Abstract We describe a new fossil crocodyliform archosaur from the Early Jurassic Kayenta Formation of the Navajo Nation that is surprisingly derived for so ancient a specimen. High-resolution X-ray
Walk before you jump: new insights on early frog locomotion from the oldest known salientian
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It is shown that limb data correlate with locomotion, regardless of phylogenetic relatedness, and indicate that salamander-like lateral undulatory movements were the main mode of locomotion of T. massinoti.
The lissamphibian humerus and elbow joint, and the origins of modern amphibians
TLDR
Character complexes identified in key fossil forms add support for the theory of a monophyletic origin of lissamphibians from dissorophoidtemnospondyls.
The Palaeozoic Ancestry of Salamanders, Frogs and Caecilians
TLDR
Recognition of a sister-group relationship between Permo-Carboniferous branchiosaurids and crown-group salamanders makes it possible to determine the sequence of changes in the anatomy and ways of life that occurred during the origin of urodeles, and to determine their time of divergence relative to that of frogs and caecilians.
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The discovery of an extensive series of Early Jurassic caecilians is reported which extends the fossil record of the group and reveals numerous features, including limbs, that are unknown among modern species.
The Carboniferous Amphibian Proterogyrinus scheelei Romer, and the Early Evolution of Tetrapods
TLDR
Proterogyrinus scheelei Romer, from the Upper Mississippian of Greer, West Virginia, is one of the earliest known members of the amphibian infraorder Embolomeri, and has no undisputed synapomorphies with reptiles either, making it impossible to support close relationship between the two groups.
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Preliminary work reveals significant differences in the morphology of the ilio-sacral articulation among extant frogs and suggests that differences in types of articulation are correlated with different directional movements at the joint, with specific locomotor modes, and wim phylogenetic groupings.
THE MAJOR CLADES OF FROGS
The relationships among the major lineages of frogs are summarized and an un- ranked, phylogenetic taxonomy of Anura is proposed. The names of taxa are defined according to phylogenetic principles.
Frogs and salamanders from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation (Quarry Nine, Como Bluff) of North America
ABSTRACT Previously undescribed frog and salamander bones from the Morrison Formation, at Quarry Nine, Como Bluff, Wyoming, are reported. One anuran ilium is diagnostically discoglossid and forms the
Osteology of Leiopelma (Amphibia: Leiopelmatidae) and descriptions of three new subfossil Leiopelma species
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Detailed osteological studies of the Leiopelmatidae support the distinction of that family from the Ascaphidac and the data do not support the contention of Stephcnson (1960), that L. archeyi is neotenic in relation to L. hamiltoni.
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This chapter discusses the origins and status of the lissamphibia cytogenetic, molecular and genomic evolution - cytogenetics, molecular evolution, genomic evolution phylogeny, and the evolutionary significance of metamorphosis.
The Relationships of the Modern Amphibia: A Re-Examination
Evidence is presented supporting the viewpoint that all the moderns Amphibia are clearly related. It is suggested that the three living orders constitute a natural monophyletic group-the infra-class
XXIV. On the structure and development of the skull in the batrachia.—Part II
  • W. K. Parker
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    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London
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The first paper offered by me to the Royal Society on the structure of the skull in this group was on that of the Common Frog; this has been followed by a similar piece of work treating of the
Muscle activity at the ilio‐sacral articulation of frogs
TLDR
The firing pattern of the ilio‐sacral musculature is essentially similar during swimming and jumping, and suggests that differences in medium (water vs. air) are responsible for differences in propulsive thrust in the two types of locomotion.
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