An Early Eocene bee (Hymenoptera: Halictidae) from Quilchena, British Columbia

@article{Engel2003AnEE,
  title={An Early Eocene bee (Hymenoptera: Halictidae) from Quilchena, British Columbia},
  author={Michael S. Engel and S. Bruce Archibald},
  journal={The Canadian Entomologist},
  year={2003},
  volume={135},
  pages={63 - 69}
}
Abstract A fossil halictine bee from Early Eocene, Okanagan Highlands deposits of Quilchena, British Columbia, Canada, is described and figured. Halictus? savenyeisp.nov. is distinguished from other Tertiary halictines as well as modern bees. The specimen is the second oldest body fossil of a bee yet discovered and the first fossil bee from Canada. The antiquity of Halictidae and of bees in general is briefly commented upon. Résumé On trouvera ici la description illustrée d'une abeille halictin… Expand
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