An Avian Egg from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Liangtoutang Formation of Zhejiang Province, China

@article{Lawver2016AnAE,
  title={An Avian Egg from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Liangtoutang Formation of Zhejiang Province, China},
  author={Daniel R. Lawver and Xingsheng Jin and Frankie D. Jackson and Qiongying Wang},
  journal={Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology},
  year={2016},
  volume={36}
}
ABSTRACT Mesozoic avian eggs are rare, especially from the mid-Cretaceous basins of Zhejiang Province, China. Here we report an avian egg from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) Liangtoutang Formation. The specimen (JYM F0033) measures 50 mm × 32 mm and the 166-µm-thick eggshell consists of three structural layers of calcite. The mammillary layer (ML) and overlying continuous layer (CL) each measure approximately 46 µm, whereas the outermost, external layer (EL) measures 74 µm. Ratios of these… 
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