An Australian Multituberculate and Its Palaeobiogeographic Implications

@inproceedings{Rich2009AnAM,
  title={An Australian Multituberculate and Its Palaeobiogeographic Implications},
  author={Thomas H. Rich and Pat Vickers-Rich and Tim Fridtjof Flannery and Benjamin P. Kear and David J. Cantrill and Patricia Komarower and Lesley Kool and David Pickering and Peter W. Trusler and Stephen R. Morton and Nicholas. Van Klaveren and Erich M. G. Fitzgerald},
  year={2009}
}
A dentary fragment containing a tiny left plagiaulacoid fourth lower premolar from the Early Cretaceous (Aptian) of Victoria provides the first evidence of the Multituberculata from Australia. This unique specimen represents a new genus and species, Corriebaatar marywaltersae, and is placed in a new family, Corriebaataridae. The Australian fossil, together with meagre records of multituberculates from South America, Africa, and Madagascar, reinforces the view that Multituberculata had a… 
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